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The Division 2 Review: If nicotine was a video game

As someone that has struggled with video game addiction, The Division 2 is terrible for my health – a truly exciting, incredibly diverse and multi-layered game that can be played any way you desire. My first impression of this game is obsessive… it leaves me constantly wanting to upgrade, up-skill and be better. While this is the objective of most games, I haven’t felt this riveted by a video game in a while.

One of the most pleasantly jarring aspects of The Division 2 is the directing/cinematography of the whole thing. From the cutscenes, to the introduction of new areas and functions – it creates a very smooth and superhero-esque attitude to the game.

Your first taste of this is with the introductory scene that could well be out of a Spielberg film. Have a go at this;

That scene sets the tone for the graphics and cinematography of the game, it’s incredibly well done. As far as the playing experience, the controls are much the same as any other 1st/3rd person shooter, with the only huge difference being the ‘cover’ mechanism. Holding your cover key (in my case ‘X’) while making your way around the world will keep you out of sight, with the game handling the transitions from cover to cover – which gives you time to worry about your strategy.

Every title of this nature has a stealth system, The Division’s is every reminiscent of Splinter Cell’s (as per both being Tom Clancy games) and really gives you the ability to play the game slowly and methodically if you so wish. While I’m much more of a run-and-gun gamer, I always appreciate the ability to choose.

For mine, I love a game that is willing to play into it’s own stereotype and really live up to the style. The Division 2 does it perfectly – within 10 minutes of launching the game you’ll find yourself shooting up enemies on the front lawn of the White House… classic.

The game takes place in Washington D.C, and not that I’ve ever been but according to all sources it’s modeled perfectly. The architecture is insane and it’s wonderful to see a dystopian future that’s not only based in reality but designed explicitly and exactly to replicate an incredibly well known city.

The gun controls, recoil and aiming are all brilliantly configured to be significantly more difficult than most shooters. Even with aim assist on, you’ll find that recoil control and staying on target are serious challenges.

This mechanism is one that will be contested by those new to the franchise. A lot of gamers are well versed in relatively easy to control weapons that require a lot less skill… but that does lead me to what is potentially my favorite in-game mechanism… Backup!

If you find yourself in a sticky situation and you happen to have a solid internet connection, you can request backup from other players online. One time I found myself on a rooftop getting the life shot out of me, pinned in the corner until I called for backup and had another player somewhere in Australia roll on through and save the day with a hail of bullets.

The game is rated MA15+ and while it’s not awfully graphic there is quite a bit of swearing.

For a total of $89.95, The Division 2 is an exceptional third person shooter that will keep you playing far longer than you should be. Pick it up in-store or online today!

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The Division 2 Review: If nicotine was a video game
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