Tech

Sextortion Scam: What is it? Why do they know your password? Do they have video of you?

There’s a brand new scam going round, and it’s not only one of the smartest we’ve seen in a while, it’s one you’re probably not willing to talk to anyone about – because it relates to Porn.

The internet is full of amazing amounts of knowledge, information, cat memes, and pornography.  The Porn industry have embraced online more than VHS tapes in the 80’s, and business is booming.

Of the top 50 sites in the world, at least two of them are porn sites.  One of which boasts something like 81 million visits per day.

What you do in your own time, in your own home – that’s your business. Or is it?  And that’s where this next scam comes in.

The email going round claims to have hacked your computer, and accessed your webcam to record video of you while you watch porn.  If true, we’re guessing it’s not your best angle.

Now if you received that email you might be sceptical, and dismiss it.  But what if that same email also had in it – in plain text – perhaps in the subject, your password!

Perhaps not the password you use today, but one that you’ve used at some point.  And you recognise it – so your senses are then on high alert – “have I been hacked?” – “could this be true?”.

Here’s what the email looks like:


I do know, <ImagineYourPasswordHere>, is your password. You do not know me and you are probably thinking why you are getting this e mail, correct?

actually, I placed a malware on the adult videos (pornography) website and do you know what, you visited this web site to experience fun (you know what I mean). While you were watching videos, your internet browser initiated working as a RDP (Remote Desktop) that has a key logger which gave me accessibility to your display and also webcam. after that, my software program obtained all your contacts from your Messenger, Facebook, as well as email.

What exactly did I do?

I made a double-screen video. First part displays the video you were viewing (you’ve got a nice taste haha), and second part shows the recording of your webcam.

exactly what should you do?

Well, I believe, $2900 is a reasonable price tag for our little secret. You’ll make the payment via Bitcoin (if you don’t know this, search “how to buy bitcoin” in Google).

BTC Address: 19ZFj3nLSJCgoAcvZSgxs6fWoEmvJhfKkY
(It is cAsE sensitive, so copy and paste it)

Important:
You have one day to make the payment. (I’ve a unique pixel within this email message, and now I know that you have read this e mail). If I do not get the BitCoins, I will definitely send out your video to all of your contacts including relatives, co-workers, and so forth. Nonetheless, if I receive the payment, I’ll erase the video immidiately. If you want evidence, reply with “Yes!” and I will send your video to your 9 friends. It is a non-negotiable offer, that being said do not waste my time and yours by replying to this e-mail.


Why is this scam so much more “real” for the victims?

There’s two reasons.  Firstly, the legitimacy given to it by the existence of a password that you know.  This immediately feels less “spam” and more “direct mail”.  So your guard is up.

Secondly, There’s a high likelihood you have that “little secret”.  You’ve visited a porn site, you’ve watched a video.  And you don’t want your family to know, let alone your friends and co-workers.  So of course you’re worried, you’re very worried.

How did they get my password? Was I hacked?

No.  But a site you once used, signed into or were a member of probably has been.  It might be many years ago, that password could be very old.  But still, they have your email address and that password and they are combining the two to scare the daylights out of you.

Do they have video of me watching porn?

No. It’s beyond unlikely.

Should I ask for proof?

No. They will just string you along, tell you that as proof they will send the video to your friends.

Should I pay the money?

No. Even if there was a video, paying them won’t make it go away.

What should I do with the email?

Delete it.  Simple as that.

How can I stay protected from the possibility of a video being made from my computer?

Install strong and up to date Internet Security software on your computer.  It will detect any malware or viruses that may be allowing third party access.

Also, if you want to take the Mark Zuckerberg approach, put some black tape over the camera.

Trev is a Technology Commentator, Dad, Speaker and Rev Head.

He produces and hosts two popular podcasts, EFTM and Two Blokes Talking Tech. He also appears on over 50 radio stations across Australia weekly, and is the resident Tech Expert on Channel 9’s Today Show each day and appears regularly on A Current Affair.

Father of three, he is often found down in his Man Cave.

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Sextortion Scam: What is it? Why do they know your password? Do they have video of you?
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